MyJournals Home  

RSS FeedsIJMS, Vol. 20, Pages 183: Bacteriocins and Bacteriophages: Therapeutic Weapons for Gastrointestinal Diseases? (International Journal of Molecular Sciences)

 
 

7 january 2019 09:00:05

 
IJMS, Vol. 20, Pages 183: Bacteriocins and Bacteriophages: Therapeutic Weapons for Gastrointestinal Diseases? (International Journal of Molecular Sciences)
 




Bacteriocins are bactericidal peptides, ribosomally synthesized, with an inhibitory activity against diverse groups of undesirable microorganisms. Bacteriocins are produced by both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, and to a lesser extent by some archaea. Bacteriophages are viruses that are able to infect bacterial cells and force them to produce viral components, using a lytic or lysogenic cycle. They constitute a large community in the human gut called the phageome, the most abundant part of the gut virome. Bacteriocins and bacteriophages may have an influence on both human health and diseases, thanks to their ability to modulate the gut microbiota and regulate the competitive relationship among the different microorganisms, strains and cells living in the human intestine. In this review, we explore the role of bacteriocins and bacteriophages in the most frequent gastrointestinal diseases by dissecting their interaction with the complex environment of the human gut, analyzing a possible link with extra-intestinal diseases, and speculating on their possible therapeutic application with the end goal of promoting gut health.


Del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google StumbleUpon Twitter
 
10 viewsCategory: Biochemistry, Biophysics, Molecular Biology
 
IJMS, Vol. 20, Pages 184: Ethanol-Induced Autophagy in Sertoli Cells Is Specifically Marked at Androgen-Dependent Stages of the Spermatogenic Cycle: Potential Mechanisms and Implications (International Journal of Molecular Sciences)
IJMS, Vol. 20, Pages 182: Comparison between Polybutylcyanoacrylate Nanoparticles with Either Surface-Adsorbed or Encapsulated Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor on the Neural Differentiation of iPSCs (International Journal of Molecular Sciences)
 
 
blog comments powered by Disqus


MyJournals.org
The latest issues of all your favorite science journals on one page

Username:
Password:

Register | Retrieve

Search:

Molecular Biology

Use these buttons to bookmark us:
Del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google StumbleUpon Twitter


Valid HTML 4.01 Transitional
Copyright © 2008 - 2019 Indigonet Services B.V.. Contact: Tim Hulsen. Read here our privacy notice.
Other websites of Indigonet Services B.V.: Nieuws Vacatures News Tweets Travel Photos Nachrichten Indigonet Finances Leer Mandarijn