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RSS FeedsIJERPH, Vol. 19, Pages 12574: The Influence of Alcohol Consumption, Depressive Symptoms and Sleep Duration on Cognition: Results from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health)

 
 

1 october 2022 13:22:30

 
IJERPH, Vol. 19, Pages 12574: The Influence of Alcohol Consumption, Depressive Symptoms and Sleep Duration on Cognition: Results from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health)
 


Aim: Healthy cognition-related factors include alcohol consumption, depressive symptoms, and sleep duration. However, less is known about the role of these factors in the dyad or tripartite relationships. In this study, we examined whether there were potential mediation effects, moderation effects, and interactions between these factors in the longitudinal study. Methods: Both cross-sectional data analysis and a longitudinal study were performed using baseline and 2018 data from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS) cohort. CHARLS is a nationwide survey program covering 450 villages and 150 counties in 28 provinces that aims to investigate comprehensive demographic information. After selecting participants from the CHARLS cohort, 15,414 were included in the study. Non-drinkers, those who drink more than once a month, and those who drink less than once a month were defined by their alcohol consumption. Depressive symptoms were defined as nondepressed (less than or equal to 12) and depressed (more than 12). Sleep duration was defined as 7–8 h per night, ≤6 h per night, and ≥9 h per night. The total cognitive scores were calculated from memory, orientation, and executive tests. The PROCESS macro in SPSS was used to analyze all mediations and moderating mediations. Results: Alcohol consumption has a positive correlation with cognition. The global cognition z scores of participants with depressive symptoms were significantly lower than those of the control (all p’s < 0.001), in different models. The memory score (β: −0.148; 95% CI: −0.240 to −0.056; p = 0.002), the executive score (β: −0.082; 95% CI: −0.157 to −0.006; p = 0.033), and the global cognition score (β: −0.105; 95% CI: −0.187 to −0.023; p = 0.012) of participants defined as ≤6 h per night were, obviously, less than the control (7–8 h per night). An association between depression and alcohol consumption has been found, and the protective effects have been reversed by depression, which caused the cognition decline. Sleep duration was identified as a moderator, influencing the relationship between depressive symptoms and cognitive function. Besides, there was an interaction causing cognition decline among alcohol consumption, depressive symptoms, and sleep duration. Cognitive function showed a marked downward trend with increasing age. Conclusions: In this model, depression primarily mediates the relationship between alcohol consumption and cognition, and sleep duration changes the mediation effect. Furthermore, there is a significant interaction between alcohol consumption, depressive symptoms, and sleep duration, which are significantly associated with cognitive function.


 
67 viewsCategory: Medicine, Pathology, Toxicology
 
IJERPH, Vol. 19, Pages 12571: An Advanced Tape-Stripping Approach for High-Efficiency Sampling on Non-Absorbent Surfaces (International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health)
IJERPH, Vol. 19, Pages 12575: Family-Friendly Policies: Extrapolating A Pathway towards Better Work Attitudes and Work Behaviors in Hong Kong (International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health)
 
 
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