MyJournals Home  

RSS FeedsIJERPH, Vol. 20, Pages 6045: Pollen Sensitization Can Increase the Allergic Reaction to Non-Cross-Reactive Allergens in a Soy-Allergic Patient (International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health)

 
 

3 june 2023 10:21:46

 
IJERPH, Vol. 20, Pages 6045: Pollen Sensitization Can Increase the Allergic Reaction to Non-Cross-Reactive Allergens in a Soy-Allergic Patient (International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health)
 


During and after the pollen season, an increase in food-triggered allergic symptoms has been observed in pollen-food syndrome patients, possibly due to seasonal boosting of pollen-IgE levels. It has been suggested that consumption of birch-pollen-related foods plays a role in seasonal allergenic inflammation. However, whether this increased pollen sensitization during the pollen season can also affect the allergenicity of allergens that are non-cross-reactive with birch pollen remains in question. This study presents the case of a patient with soy allergy and pollinosis, who experiences worsening of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms during the birch pollen season even though the eliciting food factor does not cross-react with birch pollen allergens and their homologs (e.g., Bet v 1 and Gly m 4). The results showed a notable increase in sIgE for Gly m 4 (3.3 fold) and Bet v 1 (2.6 fold) during the birch pollen season compared to outside the birch pollen season, while Gly m 5 and Gly m 6 showed only a slight increase (1.5 fold). The basophil activation test (BAT) showed that in this patient Gly m 5 and Gly m 6 are clinically relevant soy allergens, which correlates with the reported clinical symptoms to processed soy. Moreover, the BAT against raw soy shows an increase in basophil activation during the birch pollen season and a negative basophil activation result outside the birch pollen season. Thus, the worsening of GI symptoms could possibly be due to an increase in IgE receptors, an over-reactive immune system, and/or significant intestinal allergic inflammation. This case highlights the importance of including allergens that do not cross-react with birch pollen and using a functional assay such as the BAT to evaluate clinical relevance when assessing birch pollen seasonal influence on soy allergenicity.


 
79 viewsCategory: Medicine, Pathology, Toxicology
 
IJERPH, Vol. 20, Pages 6044: Assessing Condom Use and Views on HIV Counselling and Testing among TVET College Students in Limpopo Province, South Africa (International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health)
IJERPH, Vol. 20, Pages 6046: Violence across the Life Course and Implications for Intervention Design: Findings from the Maisha Fiti Study with Female Sex Workers in Nairobi, Kenya (International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health)
 
 
blog comments powered by Disqus


MyJournals.org
The latest issues of all your favorite science journals on one page

Username:
Password:

Register | Retrieve

Search:

Toxicology


Copyright © 2008 - 2024 Indigonet Services B.V.. Contact: Tim Hulsen. Read here our privacy notice.
Other websites of Indigonet Services B.V.: Nieuws Vacatures News Tweets Nachrichten